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THE SONG OF MOSES

Daily Devotional Deuteronomy 31:14–32:47


Many of us can easily think of a song that is meaningful to us. It may contain a powerful message or a personal connection to a time, place, memory. But what makes a song of faith powerful in the life of the believer?


They are not just idle words for you— they are your life.

DEUTERONOMY 32:47


In the Song of Moses, two things give this eternal song power: the presence of God and the purposes of God (Rev. 15:3). Moses is in his final days when God commands him to write the words of a song. We see God’s presence with Moses: “Then the LORD appeared at the tent in a pillar of cloud” (Deut. 31:15). While Moses was blessed by God’s presence as he neared death, he had been a person of prayer throughout his life (Psalm 90). Perhaps that is why this song is so rooted in God’s presence and power. It is no wonder that being Spirit-filled while making music to the Lord is commanded for believers (Eph. 5:19).


But a hymn or worship song is also powerful when it is rooted in the purposes of God. The purpose of this song was to teach (Deut. 31:19) and warn the people (Deut. 32:46). This song is powerful because its lyrics are the purposes of God; words to remind the people of His commands from generation to generation. And much like the Song of the Sea (Exodus 15), the lyrics of the Song of Moses are both Messianic and millennial: Christ the Rock (vv. 4, 15, 18, 30, 31) and His future judgment and kingdom reign (v. 43).


May the songs we sing also be rooted in the truths found in the Song of Moses, lyrics rooted in God’s eternal purposes that teach, remind, and call His people to obedience. Words that are not just idle words but are our very life (v. 47).


Go Deeper


What two things are woven into the very fabric of the Song of Moses? Can you think of a worship song or hymn today that reflects these things?


Pray with Us:


God, You are the ultimate musician, and we only give back to You the music You’ve created. “Crown him with many crowns, the Lamb upon his throne /Hark! How the heavenly anthem drowns all music but its own.” (Bridges, 1851)

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